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PRICE: Call For Price
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1907 INDIAN $10 ROLLED EDGE
GRADE: NGC MS 67

PRICE: Call For Price

NOTES: ROLLED EDGE. JUST 42 STRUCK. HIGHEST GRADED AT NGC.

About This Coin

#32 in the "Greatest 100 U.S. Coins" book


Coin History

Examples of this type are the first Indian Eagles that the United States Mint produced in sizeable numbers for circulation.  This type was borne out of Chief Engraver Charles E. Barber's objection to the use of outside artists for the creation of new coinage designs.  (In the specific case of the Indian Eagle, the outside artist is noted American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens).  After tinkering with the Rolled Edge design of 1907, Barber created the type that is known as either the No Motto or No Periods Indian Eagle.  The new design differed from its predecessors in several ways, most notably by the absence of traingular periods around the Latin motto E PLURIBUS UNUM on the reverse, a different style olive branch and stronger feather tips in the eagle's wings.  Additionally, No Motto examples tend to be more softly defined over Liberty's haircurls than coins of the Wire Edge and Rolled Edge varieties.  Still absent in the new design is the motto IN GOD WE TRUST, an ommission that reflects President Theodore Roosevelt's belief that the use of a diety's name on coinage is blasphemous.  Congress mandated that the motto be returned to the Eagle, however, and it duly took up its place in the left reverse field beginning partway through 1908.  The No Motto type, therefore, lasted for just two years, and the inclusion of an example is an important prerequisite for the completion of a type set of United States gold.