1907 BARBER 25C PR67 Cameo

GEM WHITE CAMEO. ONLY 575 STRUCK.
Grading Service: NGC
SKU: 121421
Cert Number: 3319183005
NGC Population: 33
** Source: NGC Price Guide. Although we try to be as accurate as possible on the listed population, third party pricing and coin information, information constantly changes. We suggest you verify all information.
NGC Graded Higher: 21
** Source: NGC Price Guide. Although we try to be as accurate as possible on the listed population, third party pricing and coin information, information constantly changes. We suggest you verify all information.
$5,950.00**
$4,250.00

In an era of mass immigration into the United States, natural born citizens and longtime residents became overwhelmed by the swarm of people whom they believed would steal their jobs or ruin their cities. In an effort to relieve the peoples’ worries, several presidents enacted various laws that either restricted or suspended immigration. While President Theodore Roosevelt wanted to grow the melting pot, he also wanted to provide for his people and to do so he and his predecessor made several deals with Japan to deny passports to laborers. The first of these deals was finalized in 1900, but it did not stop Japanese immigrants who chose to move to Hawaii, Canada, and Mexico to obtain their passports into the U.S. there. Soon, despite these regulations, racial tension grew between the states and Japan which in turn paved a path for Exclusion Leagues to form. These Leagues worked strenuously to remove Asian immigrants from the United States; their policies ultimately started in the schools. San Francisco was the first city in California to require Asian students to be segregated when they simply had enough. This maneuver shocked Japan, who was working to restrict immigration further, and created a rift between the two countries. In an effort to salvage the already fraying relationship, Teddy and the Japanese ambassador reached out to the Japanese and profusely apologized. Both countries decided to strike up a Gentlemen’s Agreement in 1907 to ease the tension. The agreement stated that the Japanese would deny all passports to laborers if the United States was able to convince the San Franciscan school board to desegregate their schools. After the initial settlement on February 24, 1907 Roosevelt summoned members of the San Francisco school board to persuade them to drop these restrictions. By March 13, 1907 this request became a reality when the board formally withdrew their claims. Once all was said and done between the two, as outlined in the agreement, the deal was officially finalized by one final note from Japan in 1908 that acknowledged the completion of the Gentlemen’s Agreement.

**Source: NGC Price Guide. Although we try to be as accurate as possible on the listed population, third party pricing and coin information, information constantly changes. We suggest you verify all information.