1910 BARBER 25C PR68 Cameo

GEM WHITE CAMEO. ONLY 551 STRUCK. JUST 3 GRADED HIGHER.
Grading Service: NGC
SKU: 127815
Cert Number: 3319384004
NGC Population: 17
** Source: NGC Price Guide. Although we try to be as accurate as possible on the listed population, third party pricing and coin information, information constantly changes. We suggest you verify all information.
NGC Graded Higher: 12
** Source: NGC Price Guide. Although we try to be as accurate as possible on the listed population, third party pricing and coin information, information constantly changes. We suggest you verify all information.
$8,950.00

Father’s Day is coming up here in 2018, but it was not always a nationwide tradition, nor was it a worldwide tradition for centuries. In fact, the first Father’s Day which took place on June 19, 1910 was only officially observed by one state and only as a response to Mother’s Day. Mother’s Day had been somewhat observed since the post-Civil War period, especially in highly contested states like West Virginia. It was here, in a small town, that Ann Reeves Jarvis sparked the idea to host a celebration of mothers that bore sons who fought on both sides of the Civil War. Jarvis’s idea was an attempt to bring the divided country, starting with her town, back together. Years later, the tradition had been lost but her daughter, Anna Jarvis, hoped to honor her mother by nationalizing her holiday in 1908. One year later, one of six daughters of a widower- Sonora Smart Dodd- wanted to honor her beloved and hardworking father the same way mothers were honored. To do so, Dodd went to work and tried to build excitement for a potential holiday that idolized great fathers as well. One year later, in 1910, the official holiday was celebrated and recognized statewide in Washington. Unlike Mother’s Day, unfortunately, Father’s Day did not catch on as quickly due to its lack of commercialization. As one florist put it, “fathers haven’t the same sentimental appeal that mothers have,” therefore they do not have the same commercial appeal. Additionally, several men held disdain for the holiday and it is written that “they scoffed at the holiday’s sentimental attempts to domesticate manliness with flowers and gift giving…” Years would come and go as people fought to oust both days all together or maintain just one, until finally it became a nationally recognized holiday in 1972.

**Source: NGC Price Guide. Although we try to be as accurate as possible on the listed population, third party pricing and coin information, information constantly changes. We suggest you verify all information.